Hamfero

Hamfero Interview

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1.   What was the inspiration behind the name of the band, and what are your influences?


Jón: The term “hamferð” is a well-known part of Faroese history and folklore. It refers to the appearance of a person – either dead or in peril of death – as a vision before someone else, often a loved one or an acquaintance. To us, it perfectly links the heaviness, melancholy and mystique of our music with the influence we take from Faroese culture and nature.

Our main influences when starting out were probably the European death/doom bands of the 90’s, and we wanted to try and dress that style in a certain Faroese atmosphere. However, we do not think of particular bands or artists when writing music, but rather take inspiration from concepts and styles such as classical music or progressive rock albums. And of course, in the end, we always attempt to create something that goes beyond influences.



2.   How do you think your career has progressed over time? Is there anything you would change?


Theodor: We’re pretty happy with how the band’s career has progressed. We started out as a small local band in a remote place, but ever since our inception we have been slowly growing step-by-step, first locally and then internationally. We’ve been lucky to work with some great people, and it feels like our progression has come quite naturally. We have been very careful to not get carried away with the successes we have experienced so far but to keep working at our own tempo, and I think that has been the right decision for us. And yeah, it has lead to us working with Metal Blade for our new album which is obviously very exciting. We have had offers from several different labels earlier in our career, but now it feels like the perfect time to try to take a step up and work with a big label to see where that can take us. So we are very excited to continue to develop, perform live and write the music we want to write and see where that takes us.

3.   Where do you draw inspiration for song writing?


Theodor: We draw great inspiration from Faroese culture and nature. The Faroe Islands is small society in the middle of The North Atlantic, and throughout history it has been an exceptionally harsh place to live. The weather can be unrelenting, and the societies here have traditionally been very small and vulnerable. The Faroe Islands is still a small society, meaning that people are closely connected to each other and whenever tragedy strikes it somehow affects all of us.

We have been heavily inspired by Faroese folklore which is often based on the attempt to rationalize tragedy and uncertainty, often giving it a very melancholic feel. And we live on the doorstep of nature in its purest form, which inevitably inspires us to try to create a certain mood and aesthetic with our music.

4.   What plans do you have for the future?



Theodor: The last couple of years have been dominated by the creation of our new album, “Támsins likam”. We are looking forward to finally hitting the road with the new material for most of February and are working on a few festival shows after that.  It is going to be fascinating to see how people will react to the new music, especially since we are releasing the album on the mighty Metal Blade Records, and we are planning to tour as much as possible to promote the new album. And then we’ll just have to see what happens and slowly start working on material for the next album after this one.

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Hamfero

Hamfero Tamsins-Review

Hamferd - Tamsins Likam.jpg

It is very rare that one finds a band that can produce something so chilling inspiring that it makes you listen to it on repeat. Hamfero are one such band. Hailing from mystical lands, Hamfero have produced some of the best metal to come out in a long time. The cover of their new album already sets the bar quite high in terms of the doom parameter. A pierced person, forming a claw-like hand, that’s pretty metal.

The songs seem inspired by the band’s local settings and that comes through. With haunting melodies, guttural growls, and clear, soaring vocals, the album moves from one movement to another. The heaviness of the guitars bring something else to the album as well, truly one could sit anywhere and listen to the album and get lost in the intricacy of it all.

Stand out tracks are Stygd and Vapn i anda, with their movements and sweeping changes, both songs truly show the variety that is present on this record, and make it one worth listening to, again and again.

Buy the record when it comes out on 12th January.