Alien Weaponry

Alien Weaponry Interview

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1. What inspired the name of the band and what are your influences?

“We got the name from a movie we watched when we were quite young, a movie called District 9 which is quite an awesome movie. As for influences, we all grew up in quite musical households, our parents were playing bands like Rage Against The Machine, Lamb Of God, Ramstein, which were all inspirations for us.”

 

2. What themes were explored on the record?

“We never really planned to have a theme to run through the whole album, but there are some historical issues explored throughout the record, combined with modern issues as well, alongside some other songs.”

 

3. What is your process for song writing?

” We usually jam and then form a song from there, or we’ll write the lyrics and form a song from there. We don’t particularly have a set process for song writing.”

4. What are your plans for the future?

“We’ve got a few songs written down for a new record, so when we’re done touring Europe, New Zealand and Australia we’ll likely come back to them, fine tune them and then get down to recording.”

 

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Alien Weaponry

Alien Weaponry-TU

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They are one of the hottest new bands on the block, the hail from New Zealand and with their new album TU, Alien Weaponry back a punch.

It starts with the thunderous rumbling of Waikorero, the words of the elders echoing over the haunting wood instrumentation. Rū Ana Te Whenua continues the haunting, with the war chant, the guitars come in, thudding, destroying the listener’s ears with just how thunderous they are. The song breaks out into some solid head banging material, the vocals are sharp and precise. Holding My Breath has a huge bass introduction, the licks are something else, the guitars kick in and the story begins with the sense that there is something there at the edge taunting the listener, the vocals are huge, soaring and searing through. Raupatu continues with sheer bombast and and balls, the riffs contain some serious fire in them, and the vocals are sharp and precise. Kai Tangata begins with the winds sailing, the war chant, the guitars drone in, and the sense of haunting and anger and pure rage continues. The guitars then bring solid riffage to the fore, and from there they move out, the song has the qualities of an anthem. Rage  is thudding, serious and just an all out mosh piece, with big bold guitar riffs and thundering drums, the vocals build the chaos into the main melody.

Whispers has an interesting introduction, with a historical conversation, then follows in with some of the heaviest riffs on this record, which is saying something. The song then continues with big vocal melodies and hooks, painting an intriguing story and one that is sure to get people thinking. PC Bro, moves and shakes with groove, thundering in and out of time with the shaking and the growling, a solid song. Urutaa is a mix of melody and solid carnage, the guitars dance around between heaviness and simplicity whilst the vocals bring something serious and downward to the fore. Nobody Here, is an interesting story telling exercise into the dangerous aspects of social media, with thundering riffs, big shattering drums and something else more prescient. Te Ara is an interesting closer, moving between subtle melodies and outright heaviness, a fitting closer.

This is a fantastic album by Alien Weaponry, be sure to get it when it is released on June 1st via Napalm Records.